Designers score high on fashion at Amazon shows

Designers score high on fashion at Amazon shows

By OUR CORRESPONDENT | | 17 October, 2015
Spring/Summer 2016 Collection by Vineet Bahl.

Amazon Indian Fashion week Spring/Summer 2016, held between 7-11 October in Delhi saw some of the country’s best designers unveiling their latest collections, and higlighting the fashion cues for this season. From Vineet Bahl’s love for Chinese traditions, to Kavita Bhartia’s modern interpretation to Ikat and Siddhatha Tytler’s gorgeous bridal collection; the week-long event witnessed massive participation from established and debuting designers.
Below are some of  the highlights from the five-day fashion event, from collections that made a statement at the event.

Sanjay Garg

The designer’s eponymous line is fairly recent; this was  only his second runway show. His collection presented at the Amazon India Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016 chose to stick to the material Mashru silk — a particular style of weaving with cotton on one side and silk on other, which historically, was a way for Muslim men to wear silk without violating the Sharia law. Garg’s collection explored three variations — the gulbadan, which had delicate floral motifs; the danedar, which captured cotton wefts resembling polka dots; and ashrafi, which had circular motifs reflective of ancient coins. The highlight of the collection was calf-length kurtas worn with cigarette trousers, dictated by clean lines and angled cuts.

Komal Sood

Feather of Freedom, the collection that Komal Sood launched under the label of the same name, spelled glamour and poise. The collection used the motif of a feather as a signifier for a philosophical concept, reflecting on an optimistic sense of lightness and freedom that most our spirits seek. The ensembles had a mix of jumpsuits, pants, shorts, breezy dresses and signature gowns, which were put together using a range of fabrics from silk crepe, to satin, to georgette silk. Sood has included a soft palette of colours, inspired by the feather, that are neutral and sophisticated and includes plush pearl white and creams, along with beige, gold, taupe and shades of grey.

Kavita Bhartia

Kavita Bhartia launched her collection — Quite Chaos — on the first day of Amazon India Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2016. Her line offered a fresh take and perspective on Ikat, a traditional weave. Bhartia used contemporary silhouettes and combined it with geometric patterns, architectural designs and paisleys to give a modern interpretation. Her collection comprised of panelled and voluminous circular skirts, dresses, crop tops, pleated pants and jackets, set in cooler and softer colour spectrum such as natural beige, tiffany blue, mint green and white highlighted with black, all replete with glitter to give it a
charming look.

Vineet Bahl

Vineet bahl’s recent visit to the Met Museum in New York perhaps marked the beginning of his fascination with the Chinese ornate traditional prints. His collection kept intact the basics of the Indian prêt in form of  a kurta-pyjama but with a twist — the line had Chinese influences in terms of kimono-styled tie-ups and Parsi gara work. His fixation was evident as he adapted the Chinese neck style, the half collars and the fancy sleeves, all designed in blossom colours of peach, blue and purple.

Gauri and Nainika

Gauri and Nainika’s collection was inspired from Hollywood legend Audrey Hepburn’s sweeping romantic style. The silhouettes were slender, and the designer duo used vintage organza material to create floating dresses made of diaphonous material. The dresses were in pastel colours and made ample use of pearls. The gowns were floor length, and had a hint of red at unpredictable places to add spark to the otherwise sombre colour palette. Vintage detailing such as high collars, ruffles and coy hemlines in teasingly translucent cloth made for an attractive, sentimental collection.

Siddhartha Tytler

Day 5 of the Amazon Indian Fashion Week saw the launch of Siddhartha Tytler’s bridal collection.  His collection made use of unconventional hues, and was meant for the free thinking woman with its bold styling, and unconventional silhouettes.

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