‘Secular’ most misused word in politics: Rajnath Singh

‘Secular’ most misused word in politics: Rajnath Singh

By OUR CORRESPONDENT | NEW DELHI | 26 November, 2015

Home Minister Rajnath Singh has said that "secular" was the most misused word in politics, and that those who framed the Constitution would have introduced "socialist and secular" in it if they had felt their need.

Initiating the debate on "Commitment to India's Constitution" in the Lok Sabha on the first day of the winter session on Thursday, Singh took a dig at the Congress and targeted Bollywood actor Aamir Khan over his remarks on the issue of “intolerance”. Aamir Khan is in the midst of a controversy over his remark about allegedly growing “intolerance” in the country, with political circles and the social media reacting sharply over the remark. The day is also being observed as the Constitution Day, commemorating the acceptance of the draft statute on this day in 1949.

Citing the example of B.R. Ambedkar, the architect of the Constitution, Singh said he (Ambedkar) had faced injustice and indifference due to social iniquities, but kept control over his feelings and always presented an objective point of view. "He never said how much he is being insulted in India. He said he will live in India for strengthening the country. He never thought he will go somewhere else,” he said adding, Ambedkar was the “binding force” for the country, while the first Home Minister Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel was the “unifying force”.

Singh’s remarks drew protests from the Opposition benches, but Speaker Sumitra Mahajan said there was nothing objectionable. “Ambedkar had felt that reservation for weaker sections was a socio-political necessity," Singh said and made it clear that there would be no dilution in the policy.

Singh said that the words "socialist and secular" were introduced in the Constitution through the 42nd amendment, adding that if the constitution makers had felt their need, they would have included them in the preamble.

Congress leader Mallikarjun Kharge sought to counter Singh, saying Ambedkar wanted to include these words in the preamble, but did not do so in the prevailing atmosphere. Singh, however, said Ambedkar felt that secularism was in the basic nature of Indians and there was no need to mention it separately. “In today's politics, if a word has been misused the maximum, it is secular,” Singh said.Home Minister Rajnath Singh has said that "secular" was the most misused word in politics, and that those who framed the Constitution would have introduced "socialist and secular" in it if they had felt their need.

Initiating the debate on "Commitment to India's Constitution" in the Lok Sabha on the first day of the winter session on Thursday, Singh took a dig at the Congress and targeted Bollywood actor Aamir Khan over his remarks on the issue of “intolerance”. Aamir Khan is in the midst of a controversy over his remark about allegedly growing “intolerance” in the country, with political circles and the social media reacting sharply over the remark. The day is also being observed as the Constitution Day, commemorating the acceptance of the draft statute on this day in 1949.

Citing the example of B.R. Ambedkar, the architect of the Constitution, Singh said he (Ambedkar) had faced injustice and indifference due to social iniquities, but kept control over his feelings and always presented an objective point of view. "He never said how much he is being insulted in India. He said he will live in India for strengthening the country. He never thought he will go somewhere else,” he said adding, Ambedkar was the “binding force” for the country, while the first Home Minister Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel was the “unifying force”.

Singh’s remarks drew protests from the Opposition benches, but Speaker Sumitra Mahajan said there was nothing objectionable. “Ambedkar had felt that reservation for weaker sections was a socio-political necessity," Singh said and made it clear that there would be no dilution in the policy.

Singh said that the words "socialist and secular" were introduced in the Constitution through the 42nd amendment, adding that if the constitution makers had felt their need, they would have included them in the preamble.

Congress leader Mallikarjun Kharge sought to counter Singh, saying Ambedkar wanted to include these words in the preamble, but did not do so in the prevailing atmosphere. Singh, however, said Ambedkar felt that secularism was in the basic nature of Indians and there was no need to mention it separately. “In today's politics, if a word has been misused the maximum, it is secular,” Singh said.

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